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NEW TEMPORARY EXHIBTION: NEW HORIZONS - FROM JEWELRY TO SCULPTURE
     

 

 

New Horizons

From Jewelry to Sculpture

 

During the Renaissance period, artists managed the skills of different styles, before settling as one, that they were mostly recognized for. Fine arts was a pre-requisite for all trainees, while decorative arts such as goldsmithing was practiced only by the most skilled of artists. The vogue for exquisite objects of personal adornment was fed by the exuberant demands of a new breed of patrons. In Italy artists could look not only to the church and clergy as their traditional employers but also to the great nobles and princely families. Sources indicate that in Florence, the sculptor Lorenzo Ghiberti described in detail of the gold mountings he made in a cameo pendant he made for a lady from the Medici Family. In his ‘Vita’ the celebrated sculptor Cellini describes how he was given a papal commission for a clasp made for Pope Clement VII. He also brags that no other master was better than him to accomplish this task! One of Cellini’s rivals was Cristofor Foppa, known as Caradosso trained in sculpture and painting, and like most of the Renaissance artists in the south, employed his talent for the creation of the magnificent jewels only after years of practice.

 

Nowadays, it appears that artists work the other way around. Education and training begins on one art form and only later artists begin to experiment with unconventional materials, styles and various art forms. Their success lies in a solid educational background, professional training and personal promotion that may be assisted from important Galleries, Institutions and Organizations. Works are marked significant once technique and style match with a conceptual justification that relies on strong individual experiences, unusual political or social circumstances.

 

In this exhibition renowned sculptors and studio jewelers as well as young artists, responded to an open call for exhibiting with artists of unequal caliber. Their positive nature is proved that once given the impetus to participate in an exhibition with no constraints, limitations on subject or matter, material, forms and size, new art was created. All 26 artists experimented with accustomed and fresh materials and divergent forms. Jewelry and sculpture amalgamate, bringing about wearable or monumental works of art and installations. The performance has been achieved with precious or recyclable, durable or fragile matter, and installations that may be dismantled for a different creation in the future. All works of art apply as unconventional, questioning traditional fine jewelry, which is what we exactly searched for when we planned for this exhibition. The result generates works of a dynamic transcending new art that lays the foundations for a new renaissance of Greek contemporary studio jewelry production.

 

Today the Stavros Niarchos Foundation becomes the patron for allowing this new art to transcend. An art that is studied and taught through contemporary museological methods at the ILJM. 





ARTISTS


BACHLAVA SOFIA   /   BOUCOYANNI DOLLY    /    BOULIS PANAGOULA


COUTOUZI CORINNA  / GEORGIADOU ATHINA /  GIANNOUTSOS GIORGOS


GRIGORIOU MARIA  /  HAIDEMENAKIS TASOS


KALAOGLOU MARIA  /   LITI AFRODITI        /    LIVADA IOLI


MACHAIRA ILIA   /  PANTAZOPOULOU DESPINA   /   PAPADOPOULOS YANNIS


PAPAIOANNOU EFFIE  /   STAMOULIS VASILIOS   /  STRATOU DANAE


TOULOUMIDI VIVI  /  TSALAPATIS YANNIS   /    TSIMPISKAKI MARIA


TSOUTSOPLIDIS VASILIS   /   VALSAMAKI ARTEMIS /  VAROTSOS KOSTAS


VLACHOU NELLA /  ZARARI SOFIA /   ZERVOU ELENI






                





 
 
 
 
 
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